Friday, 02 May 2014 16:49

Bergans of Norway Glitertind 55L Reviewed

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Thoughts:
Once you get past the Kermit green colour (other colours are available) you have a useful sized rucksack with lots of user friendly features and just a few niggles.
Features:
Lots of compartment openings. A base compartment which can be accessed from the outside by zip and can be isolated from the rest of the sack by a drawcorded false floor to separate it from the contents of the main body of the sack. An ideal compartment for storing stove/fuel etc that you wouldn’t want in contact with your tent, clothing or food.
Also a useful rear panel which again unzips allowing access to the middle part of the sack without having to enter via the lid. This panel also serves as a useful crampon bag holder (I tried one – it fitted fine) and has two loops which need to be drawn out to the outside which are for ice axe attachment.

Two external stretch side panels (pockets) are useful for carrying snacks or spare clothing though not ideal for anything heavy such as a flask or anything sharp. Many winter climbers these days stow their axes on the sides of rucksacks with the ferrule in the pockets and the shafts strapped tight via the compression straps. To do this with the Glittertind 55 would quickly see you hole these panels which are not heavy duty.
The sack sports two upper ice axe attachment points which are of good design, easy to release (once you figure out how you must squeeze the plastic clips!) and adjustable. Clearly this rucksack is designed with winter climbing in mind!

Main compartment:
The main compartment has the standard top entry along with an extendable valance with a drawcord opening. Fully extended & loaded this sack must have an internal volume of more like 75 litres?? It is good news that the lid can be extended similarly to accommodate full filling of the main compartment whilst still covering the main compartment. This versatility of volume definitely makes this rucksack ideal for backpacking as well as climbing. A compression strap included across the top of the vallance is also another good additional feature. Inside the main compartment there is also a pocket useful for stowing valuable items perhaps.
Lid:
The lid has a good sized lid pocket complet with clip for attaching keys (good feature!) I like the reinforced rear skirting which moulds it well over the top of the main compartment. Four attachment loops for straps mean you could attach you tent bag/rollmat across the top of the sack.
Carrying frame:
A nice deep waistbelt with good padding around the hips and good lumbar support. I like the double tape adjustment design for tightening the waistbelt,but my biggest niggle with this sack was the awkward fiddly waist buckle which is difficult to lock if you cannot see it – a design I would personally like to see changed. The waistbelt also sports a carrying loop on each side and there is also a small stuffsac that removes from the bottom of the main compartment and can be velcroed to the waistbelt. I understand it is designed to carry rubbish perhaps?

Straps:
Nice and wide and reasonably padded so good for spreading the weight of a fully loaded sack. Draw-in straps for the sack top, adjustable shoulder straps, and an adjustable cross chest strap help secure the pack in the best position. Good padding across the top of the back also adds to the comfort and durability. Another niggle was getting whipped in the face by the shoulder adjustment straps in windy conditions – until I realised they could be stuck behind the elastic strapping on the front of the shoulder straps –Doh!
Verdict Overall:
A well designed rucksack built with versatility and lightweight users in mind. Much thought has gone into the many features to be found on this rucksack.

 

Price: TBA

Weight: 2100g

Colour: Blackberry/Magenta Pink, Black/Grey, Cobalt/Neon Green, Timothy/Cobalt

Features:

• Fabric: 220D, 210D Nylon
• Top lid with internal and external pockets

 

Pros: Versatility, number of features, comfort, weight

Cons: waistbelt buckle
• Top entry with spindrift collar and compression straps
• Hydration system compatible
• Plenty of attachment points
• Spine carrying system

Last modified on Sunday, 23 October 2016 13:37