Tuesday, 11 April 2017 09:52

Outdoorfood's Firepot dehydrated meals put to the test

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FIREPOT has been three years in the making. As adventurers trekking through Greenland, the guys from Outdoorfood wanted their hikes to be punctuated by slow-cooked, natural food that tasted delicious.

They wanted a healthy, hearty meal that didn’t weigh them down or keep them waiting. And they couldn’t find it anywhere.

So they made their own — delicious, nutritious, dehydrated slow-cooked meals inspired by travel. They’ve kept it lightweight and easy to use so it can be enjoyed from the heights of the Himalayas to the fjords of Chile. All you have to do is add water.

Firepot chilli

The recipes have been developed over months of tweaking, experimenting with flavour combinations and trying out different ingredients to maximise nutrition, not just taste. They’ve also taken each of the ingredients and worked out how to ensure it arrives in your bowl just as it would in your own kitchen — perfectly cooked and delicious.

FIREPOT options:

Chilli con Carne and Rice
Dal and Rice with Spinach
Orzo Pasta Bolognese
Porcini Mushroom Risotto
Posh Pork and Beans Breakfast (New)

We asked Firepot how do they compare with the competition?

Freeze dried meal:

"Typically, the ingredients of a freeze-dried ‘meal’ are dried separately and mixed together by the producer, so the only time the flavours actually meet is in your pouch when you add water. They also feature confusing ingredients like smoke extract, preservatives and glucose syrup, with large quantities of palm oil. Take a look below at how we compare.

FIREPOT:

All of our food is nutritious, delicious and simple. You’ll recognise all the ingredients and you won’t find any artificial additives, flavourings or preservatives. We only add salt as you would at home - for flavour.

As an example, a portion of our Chilli con Carne has...

50% less sugar
30% more carbohydrates
35% less salt
100% less palm oil

...than the market leading Chilli meals. And not only does our food taste good, but it’s exactly what you need to fuel any adventure.

Trying out FIREPOT - By Matt Holland :

Just the packaging alone is enough to get you excited, just look at it!

I’ve tried lots of food and dehydrated packs, everybody has had a bad experience with one at some point, and it’s going to happen. Whether it tastes revolting or it looks so un-advertising it puts you off dinner.

The FIREPOT dishes themselves don’t look amazing, certainly when you peer into the bag. It kind of looks similar to baby food, not that this should put you off because you get a face full of gorgeous smelling food. If it does however, I found pouring the contents into a bowl after, it did look a lot more advertising and you can enjoy adding extra ingredients if you wished. With my Dal and spinach curry I added some mango chutney for an added treat.

Firepot Dal

Like most other dehydrated food packs they tend to be boil in the bag or empty into a pan and boil with water which is simple – Boil for 10-15 minutes and enjoy. Now whether your stove is good enough to get the water boiling fast enough or what altitude you are at, this will of course affect the cooking time. With a little forward thinking, though, you could get your stove boiling and whilst waiting for the food to cook you can put your tent up or simply be patient, kick back and enjoy whatever view you have. (Alternatively add water at the start of the day's walk, iside a wide mouth Nalgene bottle, and by the time you're ready to setup camp it's already rehydrated and ready to cook - Editor)

FIREPOT packs come in two sizes, the standard 135g and a larger 200g which these are available on request, ideal for those trips and expeditions where you require the extra fuel at a massive 1000+ calories! The RRP for each meal is £6.50 which is higher than competitors who typically come around between £3.50 - £5 but these packs will only usually go up to 500 calories, most sticking around the 400 mark. FIREPOTs smallest is 425 and the largest in the standard 135g is 700 calories which is nearly double so you are getting your money’s worth and with the flavours packed into these dishes will make you smile and not wince at the cost.

Firepot range

I can’t say enough about the packaging; it does look great and even the box it arrives in looks fantastic. The attention to detail and effort they’ve put in is clear and we love it! The added feature I’ve found with this packaging is the reflective jacket it adds; so even if it’s dark you can find your food buried somewhere in your pack. Shine your torch and a beacon of light reflects back at you so it’s functional as well as pretty. As a graphic designer myself I give them top marks.

sample 1

Away from the packaging, what does the food actually taste like?

Great, like really great! It tastes like normal food or as normal food goes, it tastes no different to food cooked at home, it also smells the same. Whatever the dish everyone who smelt the food as I was cooking them would recognise the smell and shout out the name of the dish.

I’ve found other packs have been questionable on the smell and contents for that matter – ‘Pasta carbonara with ham’ because this has seen meat in its life, looks more like a strudel mess. There is nothing worse than a curry not smelling or tasting like one either. No fears here, the Dal FIREPOT dish has a kick! So much so I wasn’t expecting it. They do use spices and flavours and they bite so this curry dish alone is a great winter warmer indeed.

Food shouldn’t be disappointing just because you have to pack light or that you’re outdoors away from the kitchen

My favourite out of the five, I have to say, was the posh pork and beans. It looked like a ground up full English breakfast and tasted like a full English breakfast so I’m very excited for when this dish is released for general sale. I for one am going to be all over this! No more boring porridge for me when camping.

Personally the pack I highly recommend trying is the Bolognese and Chilli taster pack, you won’t be disappointed.

Last modified on Tuesday, 11 April 2017 10:26